Horse Breeds – Letter C

Pregnant Carmague Horse

Camargue Horse

These are the famous white horses from the Rhone Delta in Southern France. Some say that the Camargue horse has an oriental or Saracen origin, due to the forsaking of Arab horses during the barbaresque invasion in the south of France in the 8th century. We can presume that those horsemen only rode males, not females. So, if crossings have been done, they were absorbed into the local horses.

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According to some scientific research, the origin of the Camargue horse would be the solutre horse, who lived in a marshy land, near the Quanternary Sea. Both have the same characteristics (same skeleton, same stature…) From his cradle, they went down to the Rhone Delta.

So, we can admit that the foreign crossings had no influence on the present Camargue horse and that he’s really the descendent of the solutre quaternary horse, with the same characteristics, thanks to the deep and permanent action of the environment in which he lives in half-liberty.

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Carmaruge Horse


 

The Campolina

In 1991 the Brazilian Lusitano Horse Breeders Association – ABPSL, that succeeded the Andalusian Association after the separation of the Lusitano and Spanish Stud Books – signed an agreement with the Portuguese Lusitano Breeders Association. According to this, all Lusitanos bred in Brazil are automatically accepted by the Portuguese Stud Book and by all the Associations of all the countries that have a similar agreement with Portugal. The Brazilian Lusitanos are then universally accepted.

…All the Brazilian horse breeds were formed from horses brought by the Portuguese colonizers and from those that entered South America following the migration wave started in Central America and described in the previous chapter. In Brazil the Iberian horse formed the Mangalarga and the Campolina breeds.

…The Mangalarga was bred in Minas Gerais by Gabriel Francisco Junqueira, baron of Alfenas. In 1821 King D. João VI gave Junqueira a present in the form of the Alter Real Stallion Sublime and the Baron used it to cover a group of Crioulo mares.

… The Campolina dates back to 1840 and is named after the farmer Cassiano Campolina who initiated his horse breeding activities in the South of Minas Gerais using stallions imported by the same D. João VI for the Coudelaria Real of Cachoeira do Campo.

…Little is known about the Lusitano horse in Brazil after its royal introduction last century. It was only in 1974 that it reappeared, brought from Portugal by Mr Antonio de Toledo Mendes Pereira founder of the Brazilian Andalusian Horse Association.

More important than quantity is the quality of the Brazilian breed, which is inferior to none. This exceptional result was obtained with the acquisition of some of the best animals from Portugal and the high technical development of horse breeding in Brazil. …In June 1995 the Brazilian Association had 163 members. By the end of 1995 the Brazilian Stud Book had about 3,500 Pure Lusitanos registered, two thirds of them born in Brazil. There are now more Lusitanos in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. More important than quantity is the quality of the Brazilian breed, which is inferior to none. This exceptional result was obtained with the acquisition of some of the best animals from Portugal and the high technical development of horse breeding in Brazil.

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Campolina horse


 

Canadian Horse

The Canadian Horse had very royal beginnings. Its ancestors were sent to the inhabitants of “New France” direct from the stables of King Louis XIV. These horses were of Breton and Norman descent – the Norman carrying the Andalusian blood. Influence of the Dutch Friesian may be noticed in the trotting ability of the Canadian, the feathered legs, abundance of mane and tail, and general appearance. The Arab and Barb breeds may also be included as probable influences.

King Louis sent three shipments of horses to the New World: the first in 1665 consisted of 2 stallions and 20 mares, however, 8 mares were lost on the voyage; in 1667 fourteen or fifteen horses were sent and in 1670 a stallion and 11 mares made the voyage. Thereafter, the king sent no more horses, as the colonial governor, Intendant Talon, considered there were now enough in the colony to furnish a dependable supply of colts to all in need of them. The breeding program that followed was so successful that in 1679 there were 145 horses in the colony; in 1688, 218; and by 1698 there were 684.

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Canadian Horse


 

Caspian Horse

They look a lot like miniature Arabians, but the Caspian horse is a distinct and unique breed. This small horse has been traced back to 3,000 B.C., almost 5,000 years ago. It may be one of the oldest breeds of horse in the world.

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Introduced into the United States in 1995, the Caspian horse has grown into a dynamic mini-herd of nearly 500 as of 2001.

They made their largest public appearance at Equitana, USA in 1996 and stunned the crowds with their beauty and gentle temperament.

The Caspian is, indeed, a rare breed. With careful management their numbers are growing worldwide. The breeding of these horses is carefully managed, but because of their unusual history there is little chance that they will become too interbred to remain viable.

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Caspian Horse


 

Cayuse Indian Pony

Much has been made of Indians taming wild horses, but in the beginning, Indian owned herds were actually the main source of the first American feral horses. Certainly some horses escaped Spanish settlements, but the Indians acquired horses from the Spanish long before wild herds roamed the West. The first tribal horses were likely liberated by escaping Indian people who had been forced to serve the Spanish as herders. In 1621 the viceroy allowed the Spanish settlers of New Mexico to employ Pueblo converts as herders. Forced into servitude by the Europeans, the tribal people learned the use of horses quickly. Who is surprised that they would then use their new transportation to escape, and, given the opportunity, take as many of the Magic Dogs with them as they could drive? Large scale revolts soon followed, beginning with the Pueblo Revolt against the Spanish settlement of Juan Onate near present day Albuquerque in 1680. Spanish horses were then bred by the tribes and very actively traded, spreading the Spanish horse northward and eastward across the continent as Pueblo traded with Apache and Navajo and Shoshone with Nez Perce and Cayuse and Blackfoot. By 1717 Derbanne noted that East Texas Caddo were driving horses to the Illinois country to trade.

Some tribes excelled as early breeders. The Chickasaw Horse was considered the equal of the blooded horses from England that began to arrive about 1750. Indian agent Edmund Atkins noted in his 1755 report on the Appalachian Indian frontier that the Chickasaw had the finest breed of horses in North America. The few remaining Choctaw and Cherokee horses we have left today are probably our closest living link to these excellent Chickasaw horses. It is interesting to note that these same Chickasaw horses are the source for most American gaited breeds, and laterally gaited horses are fairly common in today’s remaining Choctaw and Cherokee horses.

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Cayuse Indian Pony


 

Cheju Horse

The Cheju originated in Korea from the Cheju Province. It is used for riding and light draft and stands 11 h.h. The Cheju island is off the southern coast of South Korea. According to Professor Dominicus C. Choung of the Cheju National University at Cheju City, it has not been firmly establish when and what kind of equines were first introduced to the Korean Peninsula, but it is assumed that they came from China. Ancient records reveal that horses were among the most important animals used for agriculture and military purposes from the period of tribal states (before the first century B.C.) through the Choson dynasty (fourteenth and nineteenth centuries).

The Cheju native pony may have existed since prehistoric times, although no clear record confirms this. During the Korya dynasty (1276-1376), Mongolians governed Cheju and introduced their horses to the island. One record shows that 160 breeding horses were brought from Mongolia to Cheju and used for improving the native ponies. Since that time, horses raised on Cheju have been exported to the mainland of Korea and to China. Native ponies were also used for crossbreeding with Mongolian and some other exotic breeds.

During the Koryo and Choson dynasties, Cheju was a major horse producing area and 25 percent of the island’s farm households were engaged in horse production. At one time there were as many as 20,000 native ponies in Cheju, but this number decreased with mechanization of farming and transportation to only 2500 by 1989. The breed is in serious danger of extinction. For their preservation, in 1987 the Korean government designated the Cheju native pony as National treasure No. 347.

The hardiness and draft ability of the Cheju native pony is outstanding, especially considering its small size. The ponies survive the most severe winters without artificial shelter and are highly resistant to both disease and ticks. Mares foal regularly up to twenty or more years of age. Cheju ponies are able to carry loads up to 230 pounds.

Predominant colors of the ponies are chestnut, bay, and black and occasionally gray, black, white, cream colored, or pinto. This pony has a nicely shaped head with a straight profile, large eyes, and small ears. The jaw is deep, tapering to a small muzzle. The neck is short and well muscled; the back is short and straight; the croup is gently sloped but the tail is set fairly high; the shoulder is often quite straight; the legs are joints and tendons. The Cheju shows influence of both the Arab and Mongolian breeds.

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Chilean Corralero Horse

The chosen mount of legendary Gauchos, the Criollo horse is the symbol of equestrian cultures in Latin America. This hardy little horse is exceptionally easy-handling. To invoke its name is to fuel dreams of adventure… Present in all of South America, the name given to the creole horse varies from country to country: Criollo in Argentina or Uruguay, Crioulo in Brazil, Costeño and Morochuco in Peru, Corralero in Chile and Llanero in Venezuela.

The Horse of Conquistadors : Heritage

The Criollo horse or breed, literally “creole”, has no actual name of its own. It is the direct descendant of horses brought to the New World since the arrival of Columbus, imported by Spanish conquistadors during the 16th century and notably by Don Pedro Mendoza, founder of Buenos Aires, in 1535. Many of these war horses escaped or were abandoned, and rapidly returned to a more primal state in an environment perfect for their development, the Pampa. For the next four centuries, the Criollo breed adapted itself to the vast South American plains through the pitiless process of natural selection. This adaptation to the rude conditions of life on the Pampa was determined by selective factors acting on wild populations, which permitted them to develop qualities of physical hardiness and resistance to diseases.

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Chilean Corralero Horse


 

Chincoteague horse

According to romantic legend, the horses arrived on Assateague when a Spanish galleon with a cargo of wild mustangs sunk off the coast. The surviving animals swam to shore and are the ancestors of today’s herds. Unfortunately, the horses (affectionately called ponies because of their slightly stunted size) have a more practical origin. Most likely they are descendants of herds turned loose by early settlers. The island provided a perfect grazing land with naturally “fenced” boundaries. By the late 1600’s the island supported horses, cattle, sheep and hogs.

Penning began as a way for livestock owners to claim, brand, break and harness their loose herds. By the 1700’s it had become an annual event, complete with drinking, eating and plenty of revelry by the entire community. The earliest known description of Pony Penning was published in 1835. The practice was then already an “ancient” custom held in June on Assateague Island. Penning on Chincoteague Island is not mentioned until the mid-1800’s, and it believed to have been begun by two islanders who owned large herds that grazed on Chincoteague.

The penning continued on both islands for years. By 1885 they were held on Assateague one day and Chincoteague the next. Assateague also had a Sheep Penning, which is believed to be a custom even older than the others. Word of the events began to spread, and hotels and boarding houses were booked for the festivities. In 1909, the last Wednesday and Thursday of July were set as the official dates for the yearly events. As Pony Penning increased in popularity, Assateague’s Sheep Penning wound down and was discontinued by 1914.

The most renowned aspect of Pony Penning, the swim across the Assateague Channel, dates from the early 1920’s. Samuel Fields acquired much of the southern end of Assateague and restricted the villagers’ access to oyster-rich Tom’s Cove, causing most of the villagers to move to Chincoteague. The restrictions also affected the island’s penning. In 1923 the event also moved to Chincoteague with one penning for both islands. The herds were at first transferred by boat, but in 1925 they were swum across the channel and Pony Penning’s “modern” era began.

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Chincoteague Horse


 

Cleveland Bay horse

The English Sporthorse The Cleveland Bay is the oldest established breed of English Horse.

In 1884, the Cleveland Bay Horse Society of Great Britain published the first volume of its Stud Book containing stallions and mares scrupulously selected for purity of blood, many of whose pedigrees traced back over a century. Since that date, the breed has been maintained free of outcrosses. In consequence, Cleveland Bays stamp their get with remarkable uniformity of size, conformation, soundness, stamina, disposition and color.

The Cleveland Bay is unique in its carefully maintained purity. While the warmbloods of France, Germany, Sweden, Poland, Hungary and other European countries have produced a number of good individuals, their pedigrees are riddled with recent Thoroughbred, Arabian and other outcrosses. Registration in their studbooks carries with it no guarantee or even probability that their offspring will inherit their excellence with any consistency.

Early History

North Yorkshire, England, is famous as the cradle of two of the worlds leading breeds of horses, the Thoroughbred and the Cleveland Bay. In its fertile Vale of Bedale, from about 1660 to 1740, by breeding desert bred imported Arabian stallions to native British race mares, the D’arcys of Sedbury, the Darleys of Aldby, and other breeders evolved the race horse now known as the Thoroughbred.

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Cleveland Bay horse


 

Clydesdale Horse

The Clydesdale of the 1900’s is only markedly different from that of the 1800’s in that it has more white hair in evidence. the horse has been ‘engineered’ by breeders who have injected various new blood lines into the breed from time to time.

It is to be admitted that the Clydesdale and Shire breeds (the Shire being the English counties equivalent of the Clydesdale) have been inter-related to the mutual advantage of both breeds, although today when you see a good example of either breed, it is very clear which is which. Clydesdale breeders used the Shire breed to inject a bit more size and to give the white leg hair that you see today. Once this had been perfected, the Shire breed came back to the Clydesdale to fine down and make their leg feathering more silky and to get rid of skin problems on the lower leg that the Shire had developed.

As more white was introduced to the breed, genetics not being an exact science, the white hair occasionally strayed onto the Clydesdales’ body, giving an animal of a roan colour. The purists frowned upon these animals, believing that only a good solid colour was correct. However most people today believe that a good horse cannot be a bad colour, so roan horses and horses with white areas on the body are acceptable.

The horses of today are also bigger than their original counterparts, 17 hands high and above is not at all uncommon. These are not big ungainly ugly animals, the Clydesdale is a horse of quality with a fine head, intelligent eye, excellent paces and a fluidity of movement. They have the most wonderful, willing temperament and they truly do epitomise the phrase ‘gentle giant’.

The Clydesdale is a Rare Breed, classified as ‘at risk’ by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust. However having the reached rock bottom in the 60’s and 70’s, there are more people breeding these wonderful animals today and numbers are remaining steady, if not increasing slightly.

The majority of Clydesdales throughout the world today are kept for breeding and showing, they do not have to work for their living any more. So, go to any breeder in the UK today and you will usually go to a family farm where the horses will very likely be the descendents of those kept by the preceding generation that ran that farm. They are not there to earn their keep like the dairy cows, beef cows or sheep that they may share a field with. They are there to breed and to be shown at the various Agricultural Shows held during the summer. They are a hobby (if an expensive one!) for the farmer.

Increasingly the PR power of these lovely animals has been recognised and people are now using the horses to pull drays and carts which can be used as advertising vehicles for a variety of businesses. Breweries and whisky companies were the first to latch on to this and now you see their names emblazoned across the carts. City Councils such as the ones in Aberdeen, Dundee and Glasgow, keep Clydesdales for work within the cities and parks departments and for use as ‘publicity tools’. Clydesdale horses have also joined the ‘wedding industry’, getting dressed up in their finery to pull the bride in a cart to the church, making a memorable day even more so.

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Clydesdale Horse


 

Colorado Ranger Horse

In 1878, during a World Tour, General U. S. Grant developed a friendship with the Sultan Hamid of Turkey. Before his departure from Turkey, the Sultan presented Grant with tow horses whose descendants continue to make an impact on the horse world today. One was a desert Arabian named Leopard and the other, a Barb named Linden Tree. Both of these stallions are listed in stud books of two American breed registries, the Arabian Horse Registry of America and the Jockey Club. There impact on the horse world touches almost every breed in the United States.

These stallions arrived in the United States in 1879 in Virginia, where they spent several years with Rudolf Huntington perfecting what Mr. Huntington hoped would become a new breed of light harness horse. The introduction of the “horseless carriage” contributed to the demise of the project. Near the turn of the century, Leopard and Linden Tree moved west to the ranch holdings of General George Colby in Beatrice, Nebraska. Here the two desert horses left an indelible impression on the foals of the native mares on the Colby holdings. A new type of versatile horse resulted with the reputation of a “good using horses with a lot of ‘cow’” soon spread.

The Ira J. Whipple family introduced these horses to Colorado through a group of mares and stallions purchased from General Colby. The stallion was a double-bred son of Leopard, and the mares all sired by either Leopard or Linden Tree.

Early in the 1900s, Mike Ruby, one of the greatest horsemen the plains ever knew, developed an interest in these lines for their reputation of working ability, good disposition and stamina. He acquired Patches, a son of the stallion from the Colby Ranch, and Max, a halo-spotted son of the Waldron Leopard out of an Arabian mare, as his herd sires. Mr. Ruby kept meticulous records of every mare, stallion and their offspring he bred. This was an unusual practice at that time. These hand written records, including color, parentage, birthdates and pedigree have been preserved as part of the Colorado Ranger Horse Association corporate records.

In 1934, Mr. Ruby was invited to display two of his stallions at the National Western Stock Show in Denver. The two leopard patterned stallions, Leopard #3 and Fox #10, were seen by thousands of visitors. Encouraged by the faculty members of what is now Colorado State University, the new breed of horse was officially named Colorado Rangers, horses originating in Colorado bred and raised under range conditions. Verbal reference to those “ranger bred” horses eventually led to the being more commonly know as Rangerbreds, although the official name remains, Colorado Rangers.

With the naming of the breed came a breed registry. Mike Ruby founded the Colorado Ranger Horse Association in 1935. Two years later he applied to the State of Colorado for a corporate charter that was granted on January 4, 1938. Due to registration only being available to CRHA active members and a fifty-member limit imposed, many horses with Rangerbred heritage could not be registered at the time. Those horses with color patterns, however, were gladly accepted by the Appaloosa Horse Club, which came into existence several months later.

In 1964, the Colorado Ranger Horse Association lifted the fifty-member limit and registration was opened up to all horses meeting pedigree requirements, regardless of owner membership status. Since then, the CRHA has registered many of the Appaloosas with Rangerbred heritage that were “lost” to the organization for so many years. Additional Appaloosa bloodlines with Rangerbred connections are still being recognized through continued pedigree research.

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Colorado Ranger Horse


 

Connemara Pony

Connemara Pony
Legend has it that the Connemara Pony descended from Spanish horses, rescued from the Armada when the ships wrecked on the rocky coast of western Ireland in 1568. In fact, the Connemara’s ancestors lived in Ireland for thousands of years, although some of the Armada’s horses may have mated with local stock. It is certain that Thoroughbred and Arabian blood was introduced in the 1700’s. By the 1920’s the breed was threatened by random breeding and the Connemara Pony Breeders Society was formed to preserve the purity of the breed. A key to the excellence of the Connemara Pony is the hardy environment in which it lives. Turned out to survive the harsh weather on rough pasture, only the strong of the breed survive. The body of the Connemara is compact and deep, yet not bulky. It has legs which are short, clean, and have ample bone; the shoulders are rounded. The Connemara has a handsome head, the neck fairly lean, and it has abundant mane and tail. The Connemara stands between 12.2 and 14.2 hands. In spite of its relatively small size, the Connemara is known as an excellent hunter and jumper, and it competes in such varying events as distance riding and dressage. The Connemara was originally dun in coloring, but this color is now rare. It is most frequently found gray, but also in black, bay, and brown.

Origin

The Connemara is a member of that group of equids known as mountain and moorland ponies. It originated in Connemara, county Galway in western Ireland. Arab and Spanish blood have been introduced to refine the breed. But the Connemara, in turn, was used to influence the fine Irish hunter.

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Connemara Pony


 

Criollo (Uruguay) Horse

The Argentine Criollo is the result of selective breeding of the baguales, feral horses of the Pampas region of Argentina, by the gauchos of the region for a robust and useful horse. Today this horse is the national horse of Argentina and is a great source of pride for that country.

Essentially the baguales of the Pampas and their ancestors, the Criollo, derive from a single source — the bloodlines of 16th century Spanish stock introduced to the continent by the conquistadors. Many of these Spanish horses were abandoned by or escaped from these early immigrants. They formed feral herds that roamed the Pampas, the grassland area stretching north, south and west from the delta of the Rio de la Plata near Buenos Aires. The baguales also mixed with horses brought through the region as people migrated back and forth from Brazil, Uruguay and Chile. Portuguese and Dutch horses also had an impact on these feral horses as they were brought to the region from Brazil. It is the influence of these horses that distinguish the Criollo from the horses of Peru and Colombia.

Many travelers and explorers reported seeing tremendous numbers of wild horses in the Pampas. Some recorded seeing herds numbering in the thousands. The native tribesmen of the region soon discovered the great value of possessing these horses. Much like the Native Americans of the North American West, the horse increased the mobility of the tribes and they soon became expert horsemen. The Spanish population also depended on these horses in settling this vast new territory. However, as in North America, as the settlers moved into the lands occupied the native tribes they began to bring change to the Pampas. Fences crops and livestock breeding began to take effect on the feral herds.

In 1806 and subsequently in 1825, the British introduced the Thoroughbred to Argentina when they invaded the region. The French who brought the Percheron with them soon followed. The native Criollo horse was therefore, “improved upon” by crossing them with the Thoroughbred to make them lighter and more elegant or with the Percheron to make them larger, heavier animals suitable for draft work. With all this uncontrolled crossing, the Criollo horse of the Argentinean Pampas was threatened with extinction by the end of the nineteenth century

In 1917, the Sociedad Rural de Argentina was formed in order to preserve the “creole” horse of Argentina. The group was able to locate a herd of 200 mares that had been kept by the native Indian population in the southern provinces. This herd became the foundation for the rehabilitation of the old breed. At first the horse was known as the Argentinean, then the name was changed to the Argentine Criollo. Today is also known as simply Criollo, since the horses of Brazil and Uruguay have been determined to be of the same type and ancestry.

The Criollo is known worldwide for its remarkable endurance and stamina. In 1925-28, A. F. Tschiffely rode from Buenos Aires, Argentina to Washington, DC, a distance of 10,000 miles, with two Criollo geldings. Both horses soundly made the trip and lived to an old age back in Argentina. Annually, The Criollo Breeders Association organizes an endurance ride or “raid” to test the stamina of the purebred Criollo horse. The ride lasts 14 days and covers 465 miles (750 km) and must be completed in less than seventy-five hours. The minimum weight the horses must carry is approximately 250 pounds of rider and tack. They are allowed no food other than that found along the trail. The endurance ride is used as a way of choosing quality-breeding stock that will pass their unusual stamina on to their offspring.

Today, the Criollo is mainly a working cow horse. It is also used for pleasure riding and rodeo events as it is easy to handle, agile and quite fast. Although purebred Criollo horses are not used for polo, the cross of this horse and the English Thoroughbred has produced the ideal polo pony that possess the stamina and temperament of the Criollo and the speed of the Thoroughbred. Argentine breeders have been recognized as the best breeders of polo ponies in the world as a result of the strong Criollo horse.

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Criollo (Uruguay) Horse


 

Carthusian Horse

Carthusian Horse
The Carthusian originated in Spain. It is also known as the Carthusian-Andalusian, and Carthujano. It is used for riding and is 15.2 h.h. The Carthusian is not a separate breed from the Andalusian, but is a distinct side branch of that breed and usually considered the purest strain remaining. This is one of Spain’s most prestigious lines of the Spanish horse and has one of the oldest stud books in the world. The Zamora brothers, who had mares of this breeding, purchased an old horse named El Soldado. They bred him to two mares. The resultant offspring were a colt and a filly; the former was Esclavo, the foundation sire of the Carthusian strain. Esclavo was a dark gray, considered to be a perfect horse. He produced many outstanding offspring, which were purchases by the breeders of Jerez. Esclavo produced a group of mares that about the year 1736 were sold to Don Pedro Picado, who gave some excellent specimens to the Carthusian monks to settle an out a debt he had incurred. The rest of the stock belonging to Don Pedro Picado went to Antonio Abad Romero and were eventually absorbed into the Andalusian breed. The Esclavo stock at the monastery was integrated into a special line and came to be known as Zamoranos.

The stallion Esclavo is said to have had warts under his tail, and his characteristics were passed on to his offspring. Some breeders felt that without the warts, a horse could not be of the Esclavo blood line. Another characteristic sometimes seen in the Carthusian is the evidence of “horns”, actually frontal bosses thought to be inherited from Asian ancestors. The descriptions of the “horns” vary from calcium-like deposits on the temple to small horns behind or near the ear. Unlike the warts beneath the tail, the horns were not considered proof of Esclavo descent.

Throughout the centuries that followed, the Carthusian monks guarded their bloodlines, even defying a royal order to introduce Neapolitan and central European blood.

Don Pedro and Juan Jose Zapata bought a good number of mares from the Carthusians. In 1854 Don Vincent Romero y Garcia, a Jerez Landlord, purchased what he could of the excellent group of horses. Don Vincent lived to be ninety-two years old and because of his knowledge of breeding, greatly improved the quality of the horses without using any outside blood.

Without the dedication of the Carthusian monks, the Zapata family, and a few other breeders who refused to cross their horses with other breeds, the purest line of Andalusion blood would have been lost to the world.

Today Carthusian horses are raised in state-owned studs around Cordoba, Jerez de la Frontera, and Badajoz. The predominant color is gray, attributed to the important influence of two stallions of this color early in the twentieth century. Some Carthusians are chestnut or black. Nearly all of the modern Carthusians are descended from the stallion Esclavo.

The Carthusian head is light and elegant with a slightly convex profile, broad forehead, small ears, and large, lively eyes. The neck is well proportioned and arched; the chest is broad and deep; the shoulder sloping; the back short and broad; the croup sloped; and the legs are sturdy with broad, clean joints. Nearly all members of this breed have good conformation.

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Carthusian Horse



 

 

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